A Clue To Stopping Coronavirus: Knowing How Viruses Adapt From Animals To Humans

A horseshoe bat chasing a moth. Horseshoe bats were the source of SARS. Scientists consider bats to be a possible source of coronavirus. DE AGOSTINI PICTURE LIBRARY / Contributor

By Frederick Cohan, Kathleen Sagarin and Kelly Mei

As the novel coronavirus death toll mounts, it is natural to worry. How far will this virus travel through humanity, and could another such virus arise seemingly from nowhere?

As microbial ecologists who study the origins of new microbial species, we would like to give some perspective.

As a result of continuing deforestation, “bushmeat” hunting of wild animals and caring for our domestic animals, the novel coronavirus will certainly not be the last deadly virus from wild animals to infect humans. Indeed, wild species of bats and primates abound in viruses closely related to SARS and HIV, respectively. When humans interact with wild animal species, pathogens that are resident in those animals can spill over to humans, sometimes with deadly effects.
Read more…

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here